EASTERN FRONTIER EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION
& NORTON ISLAND RESIDENCY PROGRAM
 
 
 
 
 

RESIDENCY PROGRAM APPLICATION
 
CLICK BELOW TO DONATE TO NORTON ISLAND OR SUBMIT AN APPLICATION FEE
 
 
2017 RESIDENCY SESSION AND DATES
 
In the summer of 2017, the Norton Island Residency for Writers and Artists will be open for its 17th residency session, from July 6 - July 17, 2017.

To apply, download and print the application. A jury will select 16 writers of fiction, poetry, drama and nonfiction; 4 visual artists and 2 musicians.

There is a $35 tax-deductible application fee.

Once accepted, residents are asked to pay a residency fee of $125 per person. This is separate from the application fee, and will be put toward meals and general facility maintenance during the residency session. Any additional expenses for room and board will be covered by the residency.

A $50 deposit is due upon acceptance. The remainder of the residency fee will not be due until three weeks before the session commences.

Please note: select scholarships are available to residents of limited means. Please indicate your interest in a scholarship when applying to the residency. Upon acceptance, scholarship applications will be made available to you.

Travel costs to Bangor Airport (or to Jonesport, for residents who are driving) are the responsibility of residents. Transportation from Bangor Airport to Norton Island will be made available to non-driving residents, free of charge.

Committees of independent jurors, instructed to choose on the basis of talent alone, review all applications. Competition is stiff for a limited number of spaces. However, please note that, because committees review on talent alone, lesser known artists are often accepted and accommodated

 
“I just wanted to thank you again for the chance to spend time on Norton Island. Usually when I come home from a residency, the magic dissipates right away, but this time I am still getting up at 6:00 am and drawing all morning. I’m still back there on the rocks in the fog, still wandering through the embracing trees, still scaring up bald eagles and feeling like I’m really alive. As I hope you could tell from the drawings I made there, the intensity of the whole place, the savage parts of the island, the other artists’ company and work, the expanding time, and the psychological effects of being physically sequestered and bound by water, all made for an immersion in my own work that I loved.”
Katherine Meyer, artist